Skip to main content

#My24Hrs Part 2

Teacher content displayed on projector
So it was optimistic of me to say I'd be able to post twice in the same day... so here I continue from #My24Hrs Part 1.

So as it turned out, I didn't have a lot of time to run around to classes.  I managed to pop into one geography class and saw what I would expect to see -- students working with each other, teacher roaming around the room after putting up a motivating question on the projector, and OneNote in high use.
Using Split Screen
(Window&CursorRight and then Window&CursorLeft)
so that students can pull ideas across applications
I did manage to stop by our Admissions Office for a meeting and recorded our admissions coordinator over how she uses OneNote with students (students volunteer as Tour Guides so all their material and scheduling is done in a shared OneNote with them).  I thought the most telling comment, from someone deeply engaged in the administration of information is that, while she might have liked a lot of training on OneNote, she didn't actually need it to get a lot of things done.

And then there was the things I just did in the course of #my24hrs

  • OneNote was everywhere, of course.  And it wasn't always just the teacher projecting it on the screen; students have it open at their desks, they share their tablets when working in groups, it's on desktops and phones.  It's really interesting to walk into a classroom and see information flow quickly between and amongst teachers and students like the passing of paper, but instantly, digitally and without anything physical.
I love how the pen is at the ready, but she uses the keyboard
to quickly get content down.

  • chatting with the PhysEd teacher about her Office365 Video channel for her Grade 9 Girls PhysEd.  She has a series of videos put together to have them practice their self-defense and workout routines.  Videos are taken from multiple directions so they can get their stances and motions correct.  They use their tablets and mobile devices to both access and add videos to the channel.  And, since we control the permissions to the channel, the videos are safe from the outside world.

  • talking to the Business teacher about using Office365 groups with the International Business class so that each group has their own independent work/conversation space.  
  • The organization that OneNote offers is
    extraordinarily helpful to students
  • spent an hour setting up the externally-shared OneNote Class Notebook for my webinar on Wednesday.  This has been a huge step forward, being able to assign an external individual as a "student" or "staff" member on a section.  We've used this to do a Class Notebook merging one of our Science classes with one in France for a project (instead of one student "owning" a tab, a Canadian and a French student worked in a tab).  But, since I was doing a webinar on OneNote Class Notebook, I wanted the participants to be able to experience it as a student 


    Just because we're almost paperless doesn't mean
    we don't use paper.  It means we use the right tool
    for the job at that moment.
  •  Discussed the new look of Delve with an administrator.  She was mentioning to me how much she depends on the intelligence of Delve to make her work easier -- she's never at a loss when looking for things and she encourages her colleagues to stop sending her links or files.  Once the material is shared with her and people begin to work on it, Delve shows her that there's progress and prioritizes her next steps each day.





Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

Teacher Professional Development and Microsoft OneNote

During the first three weeks of July, I have the amazing opportunity to work at the Park City Mathematics Institute.  It is, without exaggeration, the best professional development opportunity for teachers of mathematics.  Participants spend three weeks thinking deeply about mathematics and mathematics education.

There are three main aspects of PCMI:

learning mathematicsreflection on practice (RoP)becoming a resource to others.I'm part of the team for RoP and in charge of the third aspect, in which participants consider a gap in professional development back at their home districts and work in small groups to help fill that hole by developing a rich PD seminar on that topic.

It is not easy to develop professional development.  Teachers who haven't written PD have to patiently learn how to write (essentially) lesson plans for someone else.

This year, I used Microsoft OneNote to facilitate the process.  We have a central OneNote Notebook through which I lay out the daily schedule…

Desmos, OneNote & Replay

So using Desmos activities are a great way to encourage exploration and discussion in math class -- if you haven't tried them, I encourage it.  They're collected at https://teacher.desmos.com/ 

But ... Desmos doesn't give you quite enough.  It doesn't have a way of capturing the work that the student does within their space, and it doesn't allow for annotation of class contributions as we come together to discuss.  Well, not surprisingly, OneNote comes to the rescue. 
Using the Windows shortcut Windows-Shift-S it is really quick to snag the Desmos screen and pop it into a waiting OneNote page.  From there, we can grab our pen and (using wireless projection) talk about what all the different responses mean and where to go from there.
(An aside : one of the nice features of Desmos activities are the way you can hit PAUSE and it will pause all the screens of the students working.  I always give them a heads up "10 seconds to pause..." and it's refreshing…

Five reasons to learn Math with OneNote

So, Alice Keeler - @alicekeeler- who is an amazing blogger and an incredible resource for those using Google products, posted 60 Ways Math Teachers can use Google Classroom last April.  It came across my desk the other day and, since school hadn't started yet, I thought it might be a good reflection for me on how one could do similar tasks with OneNote Class Notebook.

I went through the list and checked that I could accomplish them all with OneNote and re-wrote her post with those modifications ... but it was looking a little "plagiarism-y" so, just to check, I emailed Alice to see if she was okay with it.  She was not, but encouraged me to do my own brainstorming.
So... Math Teachers & OneNote (including OneNote Class Notebook).  My top five... 
1) The Under-valued value of scribbles & notation
If you really want to be "paperless" (and that should never be a goal - you want to be digital so that content is no-cost) in a mathematics classroom, it's n…